Building software is a whole lot of talking

Urška Saletinger
  —  2 min read

Do you know how much communication happens between teams on an average digital project?

We sure do. Two months’ worth of work with a 10-person team usually amounts to 40 hours of phone calls, 138 e-mails, 127 hours of meetings, 11.325 lines of Slack comments, 33 documents set, 1.177 tasks created, and much more threaded interactions in-between. And this only scratches the surface!

Why are we talking about an average project workload? We get asked how much time and money it takes to make an app every day. If you’re familiar with the inner workings of software development, you know there are no simple answers to such questions. It’s like inquiring how much does it cost to construct a building? There’s a world of difference between building a six-unit condo and the Sydney Opera House.

Fundamentally, the cost is composed of the number of work hours put into it, multiplied by the hourly rate of your project team.

Nevertheless, we went ahead and crunched up some numbers so you can do your own math and get an answer to that all-important question. The infographic our nifty designers made is a breakdown of an average mobile project for two major platforms and the figures are extracted from our project management tool Productive.

Project management, from inception to delivery infographic

Surprised? Seems impossible to handle? The magic happens in effective and well-orchestrated project management, an important part of agency work that gets overlooked too often and that actually optimises the entire development process. A great project manager is rarely seen from the outside but keeps the processes running smoothly without dragging your budget into the red.

In one of our next blog posts, we'll dive deeper into how we run projects to ensure a seamless experience throughout the entire journey of all involved in building digital products.

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